The Glass Tale Of Murano Island

The Glass Tale Of Murano Island

Barovier & Toso showroom opened on the banks of Rio dei Vetrai canal on the island of Murano.

The history of Barovier & Toso manufacture, one of the oldest family trades founded in the Venetian Lagoon in 1295, is strictly connected to Murano, world’s glass-blowing capital. With the time passing fewer masters are attracted to artistic glass blowing. However, Barovier & Toso are convinced that Murano glass, as any other form of art, needs to be preserved and is well-capable of finding true admirers. The brand has opened its flagship showroom next to its headquarters to honour the craft of turning millions of grains of sand into unique glass forms.

With the help of Calvi Brambilla architects an old industrial building on the banks of Rio dei Vetrai was converted into a real glass palace. The designers drew their inspiration from the brand’s past history, its Venetian roots, and the zeitgeist. The design reflects a delicate balance of old details, modern influences, and beautiful creations by Barovier & Toso. The interior filled with the play of light and reflections is inspired by the architecture of historic palazzos of noble Italian families from floor plans and Venetian terrazzo floors to the colour of each hall.

The entrance is decorated by one of the most monumental works ever produced by Barovier & Toso which nevertheless perfectly reflects the brand’s philosophy, the Taif chandelier made in 1980 for the Saudi royal residence. The ground floor which houses a reception and a gift shop is finished in a black colour range and dimmed lighting. Everything seems to prepare the visitor for the astonishment by the artworks displayed on upper floors open only for buyers. The halls of the first floor are finished in Barovier’s five main colours, black, white, indigo, red, and golden. The shades tell the story of the most famous collections of the past years. On the second floor the guests are greeted by the kingdom of light and technologies. This space houses various chandeliers: from baroque cascades to futuristic models designed to look like explosions of glass or geometrical shapes.

Luigi Lucchetta, CEO of Barovier & Toso, refers to the palazzo as a guest house. Inside the palace on the water the time seems to be frozen and kept in the glass forms while the guests may afford the luzury of looking at them.

Leave a reply